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art value 12
7. Jahrgang 2013


Editorial

The car was once simply a means of overcoming distance; yet, those who collect vintage cars wish to stop time as well. The collection of vintage cars plays with the dimensions of space and time and with the temptations that originate in time travel.

Many art collectors also collect oldtimers. Collectors of classic cars and art collectors have much in common: passion and possessiveness, and an enthusiasm for forms, color, sensory experiences, and, not least, for the stories that each individual object tells.

This symbiosis nevertheless appears to beg an explanation. This is because the car is both the epitome of economic reason and the domination of the world by industrial supremacy, and, at the same time, a symbol of our unrestrained exploitation of the earth’s vital resources. And, in all these respects, art represents the exact opposite model: It stands for freedom from economic constraints, for preservation, permanence, and the sublime, and it opposes the dictates of collective contexts.

The articles in this issue of art value are forays through this field of tension. Perhaps more than in any previous edition, this also and especially applies to the visual contributions in our magazine by artist Corine Vermeulen.

I wish you an enjoyable and informative read.

Your Tilman Welther
Editor in Chief

Abstract

Like no other metropolis, the city of Detroit is associated with the development of the automotive industry. The town grew rapidly during its prosperous years. Since the 1970s, however, Detroit has become increasingly less important due to the automation of automobile production and the opening up of world markets. The city, whose infrastructure was considerably oriented to the requirements of the now-obsolete auto industry, has since suffered from high unemployment, ethnic conflict and urban flight. In her series »Your Town Tomorrow «, photographer Corine Vermeulen documents the transformation process of a culturally and economically decaying city and its people and provides a clear view of opportunities and new forms of social coexistence.